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Electronics and Electrical Engineering Design Forum

 

RF Design

Help on HS0038

I have been trying to power an LED using an Infrared receiver (HS0038), and using my SAMSUNG TV remote, but did not work, I have read the datasheet and have applied all the stated rules…….. But I have not been able to still power the LED……

Could it be that the problem is that the SAMSUNG remote is not made for that receiver or could it be that I am not doing it well…… Please any help would be appreciated….

The second thing is this, when I have successfully powered the LED, I would like it (i.e the receiver) to respond only to a particular frequency…. I don not know if this could be achievable on a small scale, because I just want to use it for my final year project which I discussed sometime ago on this forum……..

Thanks for all contributions

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georgeokpe_1116@yahoo.com
Asked By:
George James
2 years ago
 
 
{username}
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Colin Mitchell, Steve Lawson???, anybody, Kriztian

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{username}
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Not sure what you mean by “trying to power an LED using the HS0038”. Assuming I found the correct data sheet for the HS0038 that you have (i.e. there are no other similar parts out there with the same part number—not unheard of), then the HS0038 is not for “powering LEDs”. It’s used to receive and demodulate IR transmissions (typically from an IR remote control). The IR transmitter’s carrier frequency must be at or very near 38KHz otherwise the signal will be filtered out (this is a feature of the device to limit spurious interference). So, if your Samsung remote is not broadcasting on a 38KHz carrier frequency, then that could be your problem. I suggest using a PIN diode (i.e. a discrete PIN diode without the filter and demodulator) with an oscilloscope or frequency counter to have a look at what’s coming out of the remote.

As for responding to a particular frequency: with the HS0038, that frequency will be 38KHz. There are devices that are “tuned” to different frequencies, but any of those frequencies are going to be in common use (or at least you should assume that).

Now, if what you mean is you want it to discriminate between your transmissions and someone else’s transmissions, then you will either need to design your own tranmitter/receiver with a band pass filter for some carrier frequency that is not commonly used, or you will need to include some sort of keying system — something to make your transmitted data unique.

That’s about as much help as I can give you based on the limited information you provided (it slays me how often people assume we have the ability to read minds!)

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George, post up a circuit diagram so that we can all see exactly what you are trying to do, and how you are trying to do it. (GIF or PNG is best, PDF or JPG is OK, BMP won’t load.) Provide datasheet links.

Old Chinese proverb: A picture is worth a thousand words.

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{username}
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I don’t know what happened but I did post up alongside a circuit diagram of what I did, now I just have a rough sketch of it, And what I mean by powering an LED is just so I can be sure the Infrared receiver works, And I was able to get it working last night, after changing the receiver…… If you all can remember I posted once that I wanted to make my final year project, which is a “population counter” using these infrared receivers, But I noticed that these receivers would just respond to any Infrared signal……..

In my project (rough diagram bellow this post ), I want to use these IR receivers as sensors, to be blocked out when an individual passes through, and then it would be added or subtracted from a counter based on whether the individual passes through the first line of sensors or the second line of infrared sensors….. But the major issue now is that, the IR receiver would receive the signals from all the IR LED as long as there is no means of differentiating between the different IR signals sent by the LEDs

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{username}
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Been trying to upload an image, not working

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Well, then, kudos for a clever idea: using modulated IR with a receiver designed to filter out all but a modulated IR signal! You’re acting suspiciously like an engineer ;)

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Image here

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other image

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here

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hey buddy,
i followed your simple IR receiver ckt but didn’t worked out for me. FYI when i remove the gnd (i.e. middle pin off from -ve terminal of battery) led glows dim and on a remote press it blinks little more bright.
so need some help.
thanks

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{username}
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Not “Buddy” here, but I’ll give this a shot:

Not sure why you’re removing the Gnd pin from the “-ve terminal of the battery” — and frankly, not sure what you mean by “-ve terminal of the battery” — what? The negative side of the battery? What is the voltage of this battery?

How are you determining “not working”. Unless the “RL” LED is a super bright, you may not see much. And even with a super bright LED, it is going to glow rather dimly when the HS0038 is activated. Your best bet is to look at it with a scope. If you don’t have one, or can’t afford one, and if you have a smart phone, then consider loading an Oscilloscope app. There are free ones, like this one [only qualitative amplitude/freq but good for getting an indication of the presence of signal—but kind of quirky — read the instructions ;) — BTW: having an Android phone, all of this is Android stuff — if you have an iPhone, then do the research ;) ]:

*https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.xyz.scope

But this one seems to have the best feature set and is easiest to use [costs $8] – use it in microphone mode with a home made probe or the preamp or buy their USB hardware device:

then checkout these, for probe/preamp [you don’t really need a preamp for something as simple as probing the HS0038 circuit, but if you want it to be more versatile and less likely to damage your phone, I would recommend the preamp circuit]:

Or maybe this (only took cursory look):

Also, consider that any SmartPhone Oscilloscope that uses the microphone input is going to be limited in bandwidth. Consider one of the USB add on or BlueTooth versions for greater bandwidth [check the specs].

 
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Just a thought – this may not apply, but is worth mentioning – there are (at least) two main kinds of Infra-red LEDs.
1) for remote control and similar purposes
2) for infra-red photography
working on slightly different wavelengths, so there may be compatibility issues if your transmitter and receiver are not matched.

For convenience, perhaps you could put in links to your previous posts on this project, to make it easier for us to find them.

A simple method of checkting whether an IR device is giving output is to make a simple tester, just an IR receiver diode with a pulse stretcher that lights a visible LED.
(Sudden thought: have you got a logic probe for fault diagnosis ?)

It could be useful to include at each stage of each device, a visible LED to indicate that the stage is working, to make fault-finding quicker and easier.

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Another simple way to check to see if an IR LED is emitting is to view it from the LCD “viewfinder” on a digital camera. Not sure if this works with all types of digital camera, but for every one i have tried it with, the LED will appear white or pinkish—bottom line, you will see it glowing, where to your eyes, there is nothing ;)

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