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Electronics and Electrical Engineering Design Forum

Where you can find electronics and electrical engineering forum questions & answers.
no image Tuesday, September 12, 2017 by Emmanuel Kazeera

How to go about testing the simulation?

Greetings experts, 

I have recently started doing a lot of research into cross talk in twisted pair cables. I come across an IEEE research paper published in 2017 titled "Crosstalk simulation of multiple insulated twisted pairs based on transmission line theory" by

Authors

F. Distler

Institute of Microwaves and Photonics (LHFT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany

G. Gold

Institute of Microwaves and Photonics (LHFT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany

K. Thurn

Institute of Microwaves and Photonics (LHFT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany

J. Schür

Institute of Microwaves and Photonics (LHFT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany

M. Vossiek

Institute of Microwaves and Photonics (LHFT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany

 

 

For copyright reasons, I cannot publish the article on the web page but as an IEEE member, I can provide more detail directly. I was looking for direction on how to enter these mathematical equations into MATLAB to study them. Any general advice on how I would proceed with the actual testing of the simulation equations is welcome? Hopefully, you have access to these IEEE articles(membership). I am still new to the field of transmission lines and would love to reproduce test these findings out my self.

Thank you



Comments

  • by  Neil Mula (edited)
    Hi Emmanuel, If you do have the equations, as long as you can arrange or equate it to the variable/s that is part of your concern for simulation, then you can simulate those equations by directly entering those equations to the apps with mathematical simulation. MATLAB, Scilab, and other mathematical simulating apps both in PC and mobile(check at App Store or Play Store). Hope it helps. Best, Neil
    • by  Richard Shadbolt (edited)
      Hi, Spice has a transmission line model too. Since you have equations, then you can use Matlab (Octave a free version), or possibly Mathematica. Matlab is numerical computing, and Mathematica is equation based - continuous. Matlab and Mathematica have home use licences too, which are quite cheap considering the capability of the products. I have access to the IEEE, but not the group that has published this paper. To proceed with Matlab - start with the basics, a book, or download a cheat sheet to see the summary of the most used commands. Also look for examples on the internet - there are many ways of accomplishing what you want to do. For Matlab,there is a free course on Coursera which can be helpful. Regards, Richard.
  • by  Richard Shadbolt (edited)
    Hi, Spice has a transmission line model too. Since you have equations, then you can use Matlab (Octave a free version), or possibly Mathematica. Matlab is numerical computing, and Mathematica is equation based - continuous. Matlab and Mathematica have home use licences too, which are quite cheap considering the capability of the products. I have access to the IEEE, but not the group that has published this paper. To proceed with Matlab - start with the basics, a book, or download a cheat sheet to see the summary of the most used commands. Also look for examples on the internet - there are many ways of accomplishing what you want to do. For Matlab,there is a free course on Coursera which can be helpful. Regards, Richard.

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