IoT-Enabled Love Potion Generator Debuts at Danish EOT Conference

By Max Maxfield |

Consumers increasingly expect embedded systems to have associated apps that allow them to be monitored and controlled via the Internet.


The week before last, I was thrilled to be giving the keynote at the Electronics of Tomorrow (EOT) Conference and Exhibition in Herning, Denmark (see Electronics of Tomorrow in Denmark Today).

Shortly before my presentation, I was waylaid by a wandering film crew, who posted this video of yours truly happily ambling around the show.

Now, we've all been to conferences before, so I'm not going to bore you an endless stream of photos of people standing around booths, but there are a few things I would like to highlight as follows. First, the whole event was incredibly well organized. The show floor was clean, crisp, light, and airy, and the workshop, speaker ready room, and press areas were all integrated into the flow of things rather than being hidden away down dank, dimly-lit corridors as has been known to occur at some conferences (that shall remain nameless to protect the innocent).

In the case of the theater in which I gave my presentation, rather than have large loudspeakers blaring out and annoying the inhabitants of nearby booths, the members of the audience were equipped with individual wireless headsets, thereby enabling them to enjoy every sumptuous syllable that dripped off the end of my tongue.

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Perhaps the best way for me to convey how pleasant a conference this was is to note that scattered throughout the exhibit area were "meeting tables" for people to stand around and chat. On each table, in addition to a cheerful bunch of flowers, were a few bottles of water and a small basket of fruit, all of which were constantly replenished throughout the day. Furthermore, I kept on encountering big containers overflowing with tempting produce as I strolled up and down the aisles.

(Source: Max Maxfield)

Of course, upon seeing such a display, I could not help but think of my Don’t Be the Second Banana column featuring the legendary Hutzler 571 banana slicer, but let's not wander off into the weeds.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: "Show me a flashing LED and I'll show you a man drooling," so you can only imagine my surprise and delight when I made my first encounter with an IoT-Enabled Love Potion Generator.

IoT-Enabled Love Potion Generator (Source: Max Maxfield)

Yes, you're right, you don’t tend to see many of these around. In reality, this little beauty provides a demonstration of the services offered by a small Danish company called Seluxit (I love small companies because I used to work for one). Seluxit has somewhere around 25 employees, including interns from 15 different nationalities. Self-funded, they've turned a profit every year since their founding in 2006, which is no mean achievement.

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The folks at Seluxit note that many developers of embedded systems tend to focus on the core electronics, because this is what they find to be interesting, but this can lead to them neglecting the final form of the product as seen by the end-user. In particular, consumers increasingly expect embedded systems to have associated apps that allow them to be monitored and controlled via the Internet.

In the case of the love potion generator, which is, in fact, an automated fruit juice cocktail mixer, the user can control the system using a variety of apps, including a "wheel of fortune app" for a random cocktail or an app that generates a drink whose color represents the current temperature in the city of the operator's choice.

As the folks from Seluxit told me: "These demonstrations are intended to illustrate what we’ve termed IoT Rapid Prototyping. This method allows the developers of embedded hardware on the one side and user interface developers on the other to build around a common data model of the thing they are producing, unified by an IoT platform. This method helps reduce costs and time-to-market by creating an optimal workflow."

Well, I can certainly attest that the resulting fruit cocktails were delicious; in fact, I wouldn’t mind having one right now. You can discover more about this at Seluxit - IoT Rapid Prototyping, including a link to a hackster.io recipe for Pumpkin Pi to try out Seluxit’s IoT Rapid Prototyping tools for yourself.

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  • by  Aubrey Kagan
    Max

    Those must be new glasses you are wearing in the video. 

    My facial recognition software is a bit wonky. It stores an image and doesn't handle any change. I recognize the voice, but the face doesn't match the remembered  voice and I get these error signals. I'm feeling out of sorts now... Maybe I should go home!

    • by  Max Maxfield

      @Aubrey: "...My facial recognition software is a bit wonky..."

      You may joke about my glasses, but you are the one (extreme right-hand-side) wearing the aluminum beanie in the picture in this article (are you still wearing it? LOL)

      • by  Aubrey Kagan

        Indeed, it is I. I don't have the hat- it was confiscated by airport security.

        I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?

        • by  Max Maxfield

          @Aubrey: "...I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?"

          I'm scared to think -- but I'm guessing 3 (it might even be 4 ... time is slipping thru my hands so fast I have friction burns)

  • by  Max Maxfield

    @Aubrey: "...My facial recognition software is a bit wonky..."

    You may joke about my glasses, but you are the one (extreme right-hand-side) wearing the aluminum beanie in the picture in this article (are you still wearing it? LOL)

    • by  Aubrey Kagan

      Indeed, it is I. I don't have the hat- it was confiscated by airport security.

      I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?

      • by  Max Maxfield

        @Aubrey: "...I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?"

        I'm scared to think -- but I'm guessing 3 (it might even be 4 ... time is slipping thru my hands so fast I have friction burns)

  • by  Aubrey Kagan

    Indeed, it is I. I don't have the hat- it was confiscated by airport security.

    I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?

    • by  Max Maxfield

      @Aubrey: "...I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?"

      I'm scared to think -- but I'm guessing 3 (it might even be 4 ... time is slipping thru my hands so fast I have friction burns)

  • by  Max Maxfield

    @Aubrey: "...I am trying to think many years have elapsed since the photo was taken. 2, maybe 3?"

    I'm scared to think -- but I'm guessing 3 (it might even be 4 ... time is slipping thru my hands so fast I have friction burns)

  • by  Max Maxfield

    @Aubrey: "...Those must be new glasses you are wearing in the video..."

    Well spotted -- I'd forgotten all about those.

    A few weeks ago a screw fell out of my old glasses -- I tried fixing them but it kept on popping out. So I decided to get a new pair, but they said I wouldn't unless I had my eyes retested -- arrgghh.

    Anyway, Gina says these black glasses (which everyone hated when I was young) are back in style -- in fact, some kids wear them without lenses just for the look (go figure). The big advantage for me is no screws. Now I don't even notice them.

    • by  David Ashton
      @Max...I always thought you had a screw loose...  :-)

      I used to have very large glasses in my younger days.  I thought they were great because they maximised your field of vision.  But my wife-to-be said I looked like Kenny Cantor (a British comedian from the old days whom you'd remember, Max?)  Some friends of hers said to her "You've got to do something about David's glasses!" but I wasn't having a bar of it.  A week or two before the wedding I dropped them and broke them and had to get new frames.  My wife and her friends were overjoyed.  A good illustration of the cruelty of fate and the perfidy of women....



  • by  David Ashton
    @Max...I always thought you had a screw loose...  :-)

    I used to have very large glasses in my younger days.  I thought they were great because they maximised your field of vision.  But my wife-to-be said I looked like Kenny Cantor (a British comedian from the old days whom you'd remember, Max?)  Some friends of hers said to her "You've got to do something about David's glasses!" but I wasn't having a bar of it.  A week or two before the wedding I dropped them and broke them and had to get new frames.  My wife and her friends were overjoyed.  A good illustration of the cruelty of fate and the perfidy of women....



  • by  Max Maxfield

    @David: "...I always thought you had a screw loose..."

    No -- my mother had me tested LOL
  • by  Tony Tib
    But will it play Love Potion #9?
  • by  Max Maxfield

    @Tony: "But will it play Love Potion #9?"

    You do realize that a lot of the younger folks won;t have a clue what you are talking about (the sad thing is that I do LOL)


    • by  Max Maxfield

      @Tony: "But will it play Love Potion #9?"

      Arrgghhh -- Now you have me thinking of Lily The Pink by The Scaffold (see this YouTube video) -- did you know their Mike McGear was actually Peter Michael McCartney (the brother of Paul McCartney)?

  • by  Max Maxfield

    @Tony: "But will it play Love Potion #9?"

    Arrgghhh -- Now you have me thinking of Lily The Pink by The Scaffold (see this YouTube video) -- did you know their Mike McGear was actually Peter Michael McCartney (the brother of Paul McCartney)?

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